SECOND ANNUAL DECEMBER WORKSHOP

Legacy of Greek Political Thought Network: Research Workshop

University of Bristol, 7th-8th December 2012

The Legacy of Greek Political Thought Network is an international group of
scholars, drawn from the fields of Classics, Political Theory and the
History of Ideas, interested in the continuing influence of classical Greek
political ideas and theories in the modern world.

http://www.reading.ac.uk/classics/research/class-LegGPT.aspx

This will be its second annual research workshop, bringing together members
of the network and other scholars to discuss key issues in this field of
study.

Confirmed speakers:

Carol Atack (Cambridge): ‘Technocracy Ancient and Modern’

Ryan Balot (Toronto): ‘Civic Trust and Democratic Leadership, from
Thucydides to the Present’

Ben Earley (Bristol): ‘From Colonialism to Imperialism: Thucydides in the
American War of Independence’

Steve Hodkinson (Nottingham): discussion of his recent papers on ‘Sparta
and Nazi Germany’ and ‘Sparta and the Soviet Union’.

Paul Rahe (Hillsdale College, MI): ‘Can a Republic Be Established on an
Extended Territory? The classical experience, the ruminations of
Montesquieu, and the practical challenge faced by the American Founders’

Helen Roche (Cambridge): ‘”Recreating a shared Graeco-German Aryan
heritage”: The ideal of Greek education for citizenship in National
Socialist pedagogy’

Christian Wendt (Frei Universität Berlin): ‘Herodotus as the father of
political realism?’

All are welcome to attend, but numbers are limited, so please reserve your
place by contacting Neville Morley (n.d.g.morley@bris.ac.uk). Conference
fee (including refreshments and lunch) £30 (£15 for postgraduates and
unwaged, and for attendance on just one day). An on-line payment system is
being set up, and details will be circulated in due course.

Supported by the Bristol Institute for Greece, Rome and the Classical
Tradition, the Bristol Institute for Research in the Humanities and Arts,
and the AHRC-funded project ‘Thucydides: reception, reinterpretation and
influence’.

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